18th May 2018

Why do we need the World Government?

Peter H. Diamandis, MD

Posted 18/5/2018

This is how Ray Kurzweil, from Google, sees it in an interview with Peter Diamandis:

Nov 10, 2017

https://singularityhub.com/2017/11/10/3-dangerous-ideas-from-ray-kurzweil/#sm.0000iglzp2h0we7ww1g2abtfxuw5w

The nation-state will soon be irrelevant.

 Historically, we humans don’t like change. We like waking up in the morning and knowing that the world is the same as the night before. That’s one reason why government institutions exist: to stabilize society. But how will this change in 20 or 30 years? What role will stabilizing institutions play in a world of continuous, accelerating change?

“Institutions stick around, but they change their role in our lives,” Ray explained. “They already have. The nation-state is not as profound as it was. Religion used to direct every aspect of your life, minute to minute. It’s still important in some ways, but it’s much less important, much less pervasive. [It] plays a much smaller role in most people’s lives than it did, and the same is true for governments.”

Ray continues: “We are fantastically interconnected already. Nation-states are not islands anymore. So we’re already much more of a global community. The generation growing up today really feels like world citizens much more than ever before, because they’re talking to people all over the world, and it’s not a novelty.”

I’ve previously shared my belief that national borders have become extremely porous, with ideas, people, capital, and technology rapidly flowing between nations. In decades past, your cultural identity was tied to your birthplace. In the decades ahead, your identity is more a function of many other external factors. If you love space, you’ll be connected with fellow space-cadets around the globe more than you’ll be tied to someone born next door.